Thromboelastography and Thromboelastometry in Assessment of Fibrinogen Deficiency and Prediction for Transfusion Requirement: A Descriptive Review

Biomed Res Int. 2018; 2018: 7020539

Both Thromboelastography (TEG) and Rotational Thromboelastometry (ROTEM) have been increasingly used to diagnose fibrinogen deficiency and guide fibrinogen transfusion in trauma and surgical bleeding patients.

Fibrinogen is crucial for the formation of blood clot and clinical outcomes in major bleeding. Both Thromboelastography (TEG) and Rotational Thromboelastometry (ROTEM) have been increasingly used to diagnose fibrinogen deficiency and guide fibrinogen transfusion in trauma and surgical bleeding patients. We conducted a comprehensive and comparative review on the technologies and clinical applications of two typical functional fibrinogen assays using TEG (FF TEG) and ROTEM (FIBTEM) for assessment of fibrinogen level and deficiency, and prediction of transfusion requirement. Clot strength and firmness of FF TEG and ROTEM FIBTEM were the most used parameters, and their associations with fibrinogen levels as measured by Clauss method ranged from 0 to 0.9 for FF TEG and 0.27 to 0.94 for FIBTEM. A comparison of the interchangeability and clinical performance of the functional fibrinogen assays using the two systems showed that the results were correlated, but are not interchangeable between the two systems. It appears that ROTEM FIBTEM showed better associations with the Clauss method and more clinical use for monitoring fibrinogen deficiency and predicting transfusion requirements including fibrinogen replacement than FF TEG. TEG and ROTEM functional fibrinogen tests play important roles in the diagnosis of fibrinogen-related coagulopathy and guidance of transfusion requirements. Despite the fact that high-quality evidence is still needed, the two systems are likely to remain popular for the hemostatic management of bleeding patients.

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