Quality of Life After Coronary Bypass: a Multicentre Study of Routinely Collected Health Data in the Netherlands

Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2019 Sep 1;56(3):526-533

In this study, our aim was to explore how coronary artery bypass grafting affects quality of life, and how this varies with age, particularly with patients at risk of deterioration.

OBJECTIVES

In this study, our aim was to explore how coronary artery bypass grafting affects quality of life, and how this varies with age, particularly with patients at risk of deterioration.

METHODS

In a retrospective, multicentre cohort study, patients with isolated coronary artery bypass grafting and electively operated between January 2011 and January 2015 with pre- and postoperative quality-of-life data were included. Patients were classified into 3 age groups: <65, 65–79 and ≥80 years. Quality of life was measured up to 1-year follow-up using the Short Form-12 or the Short Form-36 health survey. A multivariable, linear regression analysis, with an adjustment for confounders, was used to evaluate the association between age and quality of life.

RESULTS

A total of 2606 patients were included in this study. Upon one-year of follow-up, the mean physical health of patients increased from 54 at baseline to 68, and mental health increased from 60 to 67. We observed decreased mental health in 20% of patients aged <65 years, 20% of patients aged 65–79 years and 29% of patients aged ≥80 years (P = 0.039). In this study, age was not associated with a lower physical or mental component score (P = 0.054 and P = 0.13, respectively). Independent risk factors for a decrease in quality of life consist of a better physical and mental score at baseline (P < 0.001) and a reduced left ventricular function (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Most patients experience a relevant increase in physical and mental quality of life, but a proportion of patients aged ≥80 years undergo significant deterioration in mental health.