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Neurologic Outcomes in Patients Who Undergo Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Ann Thorac Surg. 2019 Sep;108(3):749-755

This study aimed to develop a risk prediction model for neurologic outcomes in patients who underwent extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR).

Background

This study aimed to develop a risk prediction model for neurologic outcomes in patients who underwent extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR).

Methods

Between May 2004 and April 2016, a total of 274 patients who underwent ECPR were included in this analysis. The primary outcome was neurologic status on discharge from the hospital, as assessed by Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC) scale. To develop a new predictive scoring system, backward stepwise elimination and a z-score–based scoring scheme were used on the basis of logistic regression analyses.

Results

A total of 95 patients (34.7%) survived until discharge. Of these, 78 patients (28.5%) had favorable neurologic outcomes (CPC scores of 1 or 2). In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, significant predictors of poor neurologic outcome included age older than 65 years, initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score greater than 13 points, first monitored arrest rhythm, low-flow time longer than 30 minutes, initial pulse pressure less than 25 mm Hg, initial mean arterial pressure less than 70 mm Hg, and serum glucose level greater than 300 mg/dL. There was also a significant interaction between age and low-flow time. The newly developed neurologic outcome score after ECPR (nECPR) more effectively predicted poor neurologic outcome (C-statistic, 0.867; 95% confidence interval, 0.823 to 0.912) than the former ECPR score (p = 0.019) and the survival after venoarterial ECMO score (p< 0.001).

Conclusions

The investigators created a risk prediction model for neurologic outcomes using independent predictors and the interaction between age and low-flow time, and this new scoring system could predict early neurologic prognosis more effectively in ECPR-treated patients. It may be help guide decisions in ECPR management for intensivists, cardiovascular surgeons, or cardiologists.

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