Hyperlactatemia of Dialysis-Dependent Patients After Cardiac Surgery Impacts on In-Hospital Mortality: A Two-Center Retrospective Study

JA Clin Rep. 2020 Jun 11;6(1):47

In dialysis-dependent patients after cardiac surgery, the early-onset of a maximum arterial lactate concentration of > 4.5 mmol/L was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality.

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Background

Lactate is a well-known marker to estimate prognosis after cardiac surgery and critically ill patients. The liver and kidney have a major role in lactate metabolism; however, there was less characterized about the change of lactate and threshold to predict in-hospital mortality in dialysis-dependent patients undertaking cardiac surgery. We conducted this retrospective observational study to characterize when and how lactate values after cardiac surgery affected in-hospital mortality.

Methods

This two-center retrospective study included dialysis-dependent patients who underwent cardiac surgery with a cardiopulmonary bypass from January 2014 to December 2018. Lactate values were collected at three points: at ICU admission (T1), the maximum level of lactate within 24 h postoperatively (T2), and 24 h after ICU admission (T3). We determined hyperlactatemia as more than 2 mmol/L following previous studies.

Results

We enrolled 122 dialysis-dependent patients. The mean age was 73 ± 8 years and hyperlactatemia was observed in 100 patients (81.9%). In-hospital mortality was 11.4%. Univariate analysis and area under curve in ROC suggested that T2 lactate was the most significantly associated with in-hospital mortality (AUC = 0.845). Multivariate logistic analysis showed a significant association between in-hospital mortality when patients showed early peak lactate levels of > 4.5 mmol/L after ICU admission (adjusted OR 8.35; 95% CI: 1.44–57.13).

Conclusions

In dialysis-dependent patients after cardiac surgery, the early-onset of a maximum arterial lactate concentration of > 4.5 mmol/L was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality.