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The Future of the Profession...

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u0549788 View Drop Down
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Joined: Dec 13 2008
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  Quote u0549788 Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Topic: The Future of the Profession...
    Posted: Dec 13 2008 at 3:12pm
Hey everyone!  I have a question for practicing CCP's....
 
With all the talk of the future of cardiac surgery, what are the chances that I get into this field and then am out of work in 10 years???  I have seen hundreds of heart surgeries, and when I talk with our perfusionists they assure me that there will be work-and although scared sometimes (because of the lack of caseloads) there is always work-and they always get busy again.  They try and assure me that even with all the advances, it's a secure profession and they don't see it going anywhere....
 
With that said, everyone else who I speak with (nurses, PA's, physician's, ect..ect...) they all think that its a "dying field" and that it will be dissolved someday....
 
I don't know who to believe.  I think the profession is a great fit for me.  Ive spent a few years trying to figure out what would be the best profession for me-trying to make a good/logical decision, and have (through some deep contemplations) decided upon perfusion.  But is it a risk?  If the trend continues downward to OP-CABGs and valves-then what??? I know that the perfusionists I work with love their job, and I know I would too...but is is worth the "risk?"  The last thing I want to do is be settled in a career-10 years down the road and then have to be up-rooted with my family because I lost my work.
 
ANY insight would be an extreme help!!!  Thanks!
 
Mike
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powerade View Drop Down
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  Quote powerade Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: Nov 07 2009 at 12:47am
Interesting thread, any comments?

Edited by powerade - Nov 07 2009 at 1:08am
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racine View Drop Down
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  Quote racine Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: Nov 07 2009 at 7:53am
There are no guarantees in anything except death and taxes.  I hope you can get a better or clearer outlook on this profession.  I personally believe that Opcabs have a limited lifespan and regular surgery will shine through.  Stenting results have been leveling out with outcomes still less than conventional surgery.  This is a profession that is more of a passion for me.  You will have to pay your dues like most of us.  If you want job security you might want to get into flying, law, politics, etc...  My job security is based on my commitment to my career and the quality of that consistent product.  Eventually you might realize that nothing is forever but that you've made a good long go of it and made many peoples lives better in the long run. 
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sprintermike View Drop Down
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  Quote sprintermike Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: Dec 22 2009 at 11:05am
There are a few lines of thinking concerning this topic...
1. People have been saying perfusion is a dying profession for twenty years, and we are still here. If you want to be rock solid, go after the cases that cannot be done off pump (pediatric repairs, as well as some aneurysms). Stem cell therapy is probably the future for myocardial infarctions, but it won't affect all cases/types.
2. The case loads for "bread and butter" type cases HAVE gone down, sometimes SIGNIFICANTLY. This affects the number of perfusionists, but not their existence. I personally got an RN after I became a perfusionist so that I would have something else to do if our case numbers dropped significantly. In order to preserve the integrity of the profession, I would encourage everyone, if possible, to have a back up plan. What you don't want is 3000 perfusionists, 2800 of whom are not certified to do anything else, trying to compete for enough work to keep 1500 perfusionists empoyed.
What would be great is to have 3000 perfusionists, 2800 of whom are RN's, RT's, PA"s, CFA's, etc. and if the case loads go down and pay takes a hit, they leave the profession, automatically correcting the number of perfusionists, which automatically corrects the supply/demand numbers and thus pay.
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